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Madame Bovary 2015

R CC

Desperate to escape the dullness of provincial life, a young married woman (Mia Wasikowska) pursues forbidden fantasies through a series of indiscreet seductions and adulterous affairs. Based on the acclaimed novel that transformed the Romantic era.

Starring:
Ezra Miller, Mia Wasikowska
Runtime:
1 hour, 58 minutes

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Product Details

Genres Drama
Director Sophie Barthes
Starring Ezra Miller, Mia Wasikowska
Supporting actors Logan Marshall-Green, Paul Giamatti, Rhys Ifans, Laura Carmichael, Henry Lloyd-Hughes, Morfydd Clark, Luke Tittensor, Richard Cordery, Olivier Gourmet
Studio Alchemy
MPAA rating R (Restricted)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly Details
Format Amazon Video (streaming online video)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Amazon Video Verified Purchase
Mia Wasikowska, in this new, atmospheric adaptation of "Madame Bovary" (a revolutionary classic), makes a fascinating, sensitive, and convincing Emma; one that resembles not so much previous Bovary's from previous films, but rather the complicated, twenty-something, anti-heroine of the novel (which I've long loved). Casting an uncanny spell, the young actress captures much of the conflicted ambiguity of Emma, and manages to create empathy while making so many foolish, self-destructive choices. I've watched the film twice, and by the second viewing I got past the differences from the book (I know all the dialogue and scenes), the gradual pace, and was absorbed by the melancholy stillness that builds, in stages, to the soul's unraveling. I haven't felt any movie has captured the book (which may be an impossible feat), but this one is subtle and affecting; it has it's own poetic perspective, mystique and beauty (without the novel's ironic detachment), and Mia's portrayal has the enigmatic, haunting qualities that have made me a Bovary addict.

Scenes of Emma running ornately clad through cow pastures vividly show her stranger-in-a-strange-land status (a peacock surrounded by peasantry). There were many references to her conflicted relationship to nature (reality), including the hunt with the Marquis, that I felt were effective, showing her, after the killing of the stag, instinctively seeking power and station equal to men. Emma asserted herself through her sexuality (adulterous affairs), and conspicuous consumption; not surprisingly, this didn't work out too well. I think that in both the book and this film, Emma is seeking some measure of power, and, of course, love, but in a reckless, unconscious way. The final, climactic scene was stark and poignant; it felt real to me.
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Format: Amazon Video Verified Purchase
The latest in a long line of adaptations of the seminal novel by Gustave Flaubert, French-born director Sophie Barthes' (Cold Souls) English-language Madame Bovary is a compact and often gorgeous rendering, though definitely more of a cerebral experience than a red-hot story of sensuality and tragedy. In a rather curious misfire, Barthes opens her film at the end, with a poisoned Emma Bovary (Mia Wasikowska) racing through the forest, tightly clutching her side and then falling to the ground. It is an overly literal and revelatory way to begin a film already defined by its air of inevitable despair and doom. Then, however, an elegant and well-crafted depiction of tedious provincial life emerges, with several moments of genuine visual poetry, particularly ones contrasting Emma's increasing flamboyance with her pastoral environment and the way the disparity insulates and misguides her.

Barthes completely foregrounds the title heroine (anti-heroine?), excising the Flaubert novel's early shared focus on Charles (Henry Lloyd-Hughes), her doting, but unimaginative husband. The film sprints behind her as she ends her authoritarian education at a convent, weds, and moves to live with her husband in an out-of-the-way hamlet very far from the Paris she dreams of. Wasikowska, of whom I am an enormous fan, is dynamic in the lead role. She exhibits sympathy for her character's plight, but is also unafraid to explore her sinister side: tendencies toward greed, self-destruction, and vanity which emerge as she pursues an empty and unrealistic type of fulfillment. (It is a bit of a shame this adaptation ignores the character of Berthe, Charles and Emma's daughter, denying the star the chance to play provocative scenes of domestic malaise further complicated by maternal discontent.
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Format: DVD
"Please God, let him be the one". "Please God, let him be the one". "Please God, let him be the one"; daughter Emma (Mia Wasikowska) pleads aloud in front of her mirror concerned about her impending nuptials to Dr. Charles Bovary (Henry Lloyd-Hughes), a well-respected small-town doctor within his community of Yonville which this story is set. This is based on the quite scandalous, at the time, eighteen-fifty-six novel by Gustave Flaubert. Co-written for the screen by Felipe Marino along with Sophie Barthes set in provincial France who also takes the director's chair and I felt brought out the emotions and feelings of such a woman as Emma whose passions burned brightly for love and reckless enthusiasm for living while trying to avoid its repercussions. This is not fulfilled with Dr. Charles Bovary. Emma believes he is a man married to his work leaving her lonely.

Barthes brings to the role a pull toward the convictions of Emma's upbringing in a convent of which she was not always able to conform to. Learning the basics of the day which consisted of etiquette, walking, drawing along with musical interests among other amenities, all in the highest hopes of acquiring a substantial marriage partner. Emma was sent to pass her time only reading about the interests and concerns of the world. The dismal and moody shots of this woman trapped within a shadowy and gloom-filled life which is held back by a conformity she really desires to break free of; those chains consuming her are well represented. She spends much time alone with the intoxicating idea of romance which fills the novels of which are mentioned, but only to a small degree.
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