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Alec Wilder's American Popular Song - 21

Derek Rivers
The list author says: "AMERICAN POPULAR SONG The Great Innovators 1900-1950 by Alec Wilder

Chapter 10 THE GREAT CRAFTSMEN continued

III HARRY WARREN (1893-1981) IV ISHAM JONES (1894-1956) V JIMMY
MC HUGH (1894-1969) VI DUKE ELLINGTON (1899-1974)"
Cozy / Man & A Woman
Cozy / Man & A Woman
"Would You Like To Take a Walk (Harry Warren, music; Mort Dixon and Billy Rose, lyric - from Sweet and Low, 1930) Steve Lawrence and Eydie Gorme  "over-cute lyric...prejudiced me...melody...is very good writing, suggesting a wider knowledge of music than popular songs""
The Very Thought of You
The Very Thought of You
"I Found a Million Dollar Baby (Harry Warren, music; Mort Dixon and Billy Rose, lyric - from Crazy Quilt, 1931) Nat King Cole  "as typical and famous a product of the United States as Coca Cola...a charming song, with a very good lyric...no special virtue..outside of...the parenthetical 'Incident'ly' at its cadence""
Play 22 Original Big Band Recordings
Play 22 Original Big Band Recordings
"You're Getting To Be a Habit with Me (Harry Warren, music; Al Dubin, lyric - from Forty-Second Street, film, 1932) Eddy Howard  "a pretty notey song, but it still works...very cheery and saucy...old time 'I really mean it' extension...has the same grin on its face""
Reflections
Reflections
"(You May Not Be an Angel but) I'll String Along with You (Harry Warren, music; Al Dubin, lyric - from Twenty Million Sweethearts, film, 1934) B. B. King  "a hack job""
Best of Flamingos
Best of Flamingos
"I Only Have Eyes for You (Harry Warren, music; Al Dubin, lyric - from Dames, film, 1934) The Flamingos  "a very lovely melody, beautifully and dramatically fashioned...needs no harmony in order to please...step-wise writing is effective throughout...in a class with the best of theater writing""
42nd Street (1980 Original Broadway Cast)
42nd Street (1980 Original Broadway Cast)
"Lullaby of Broadway (Harry Warren, music; Al Dubin, lyric - from Gold Diggers of 1935, film) Jerry Orbach and company  "a very simple, swinging little song...interest is primarily rhythmic, yet its neat little tune is riffish and shows a splendid use of repeated notes...more a production number than a pop song""
Complete Bethlehem Collection
Complete Bethlehem Collection
"Summer Night (Harry Warren, music; Al Dubin, lyric - from Sing Me a Love Song, film, 1936) Helen Carr  "one of Warren's most pure and beautiful melodies...in the category of theater songs and deserves much more recognition than it has received""
Betcha Bottom Dollar
Betcha Bottom Dollar
"Jeepers Creepers (Harry Warren, music; Johnny Mercer, lyric - from Going Places, film, 1938) The Puppini Sisters  "a wonderful rhythm song, with an equally wonderful lyric...begs no quarter, merely rolls up its sleeves and goes to work...it swings and is its own marvelous salty self""
Cadillac Records (Deluxe)(Music From the Motion Picture)
Cadillac Records (Deluxe)(Music From the Motion Picture)
"At Last (Harry Warren, music; Mack Gordon, lyric - from Orchestra Wives, film, 1942) Beyonce  "another very good example of step-wise writing...only complaint is its rather angular ending""
Great Band With Great Voices / Swing the Great Voices of the Great Bands
Great Band With Great Voices / Swing the Great Voices of the Great Bands
"Serenade in Blue (Harry Warren, music; Mack Gordon, lyric - from Orchestra`Wives, film, 1942) The Johnny Mann Singers with the Si Zentner Orchestra  "uncharacteristic of Warren...just might be Carmichael, or...even Arlen...full of notes...but every one a good one...release is a very daring reiteration of notes...a very groovy song""
Live at Jazz Standard
Live at Jazz Standard
"There Will Never Be Another You (Harry Warren, music; Mack Gordon, lyric - from Iceland, film, 1942) Nancy King  "just may be the loveliest of all Warren songs...not a poorly chosen note...sinuous, graceful, sentimental, totally lacking in cliche...lovely, lovely ending""
Call Me: The A&M Years
Call Me: The A&M Years
"The More I See You (Harry Warren, music; Mack Gordon, lyric - from Diamond Horseshoe, film, 1945) Chris Montez  "another lovely, pure, long-line melody...sings by itself, even though the second eight measures are ingeniously harmonized...that limpidity so often associated with Kern""
Yes Indeed
Yes Indeed
"On the Alamo (Isham Jones. music; Gus Kahn, lyric - 1922) Jo Stafford  "very smooth and even builds to a dramatic climax...initial phrase repeats, and the value of the repetition lies in the change of harmony""
Primrose Lane:Golden Classics
Primrose Lane:Golden Classics
"Swingin' Down the Lane (Isham Jones, music; Gus Kahn, lyric - 1923) Jerry Wallace  "a cheery song which in another's hands could easily have become a cliche...Jones never allows his motif to become a series of parallel imitations""
Hittin the Hi Spots
Hittin the Hi Spots
"I'll See You in My Dreams (Isham Jones, music; Gus Kahn, lyric - 1924) Joe Brown  "perhaps the best example in all of popular music of minimal notes...melody is such a marvel of lyricism and economy that it makes the harmony almost irrelevant...section...which had its first trial in Swingin' Down the Lane""
Marty After Midnight
Marty After Midnight
"It Had To Be You (Isham Jones, music; Gus Kahn, lyric - 1924) Marty Robbins  "John Mercer's favorite pop song...a good choice...character is so uninterruptedly maintained and certain phrases so deftly fashioned that it reaches the listener as a wholly agreeable moment in time""
Her Very Best
Her Very Best
"The One I Love (Belongs to Somebody Else) (Isham Jones, music; Gus Kahn, lyric - 1924) Gogi Grant  "strong and forthright...less dramatic than On the Alamo, less lyric than I'll See You in My Dreams, but it is an honest, well-conceived pop song""
Spaceship Lullaby (1954-60)
Spaceship Lullaby (1954-60)
"The Wooden Soldier and the China Doll (Isham Jones, music; Charles Newman, lyric - 1932) NU Sounds with Sun Ra (piano)  "beguiling...I remember it with great affection""
Rockin / Hell Bent for Leather
Rockin / Hell Bent for Leather
"On the Sunny Side of the Street (Jimmy McHugh, music; Dorothy Fields, lyric - from Lew Leslie's International Revue, 1930) Frankie Laine  "one of the jazz musicians' favorites...extremely fine lyric...release is very deft""
Back To The Roots
Back To The Roots
"Exactly Like You (Jimmy McHugh, music; Dorothy Fields, lyric - from Lew Leslie's International Revue, 1930) Kay Starr  "a less bumptious melody...evocative...for a pop song it's very rangy...Dorothy Fields...her lyrics often swung, and their deceptive ease gave a special luster to McHugh's music""
Essential Louis Armstrong
Essential Louis Armstrong
"Blue Again (Jimmy McHugh, music; Dorothy Fields, lyric - from The Vanderbilt Revue, 1930) Louis Armstrong  "almost like something written for a formal dance...a deliberate stance and elegance about it...release not only loses this flavor but is very nearly a cliche""
Definitive Pop
Definitive Pop
"Don't Blame Me (Jimmy McHugh, music; Dorothy Fields, lyric - from Clowns in Clover, 1932) The Everly Brothers  "a standard if ever there was one...very sparely though lushly written...opening phrase in the music is as absorbing as a great first sentence in a story""
Look Out It's Joanie Sommers
Look Out It's Joanie Sommers
"I Feel a Song Comin' On (Jimmy McHugh, music; Dorothy Fields and George Oppenheimer, lyric - from Every Night at Eight, film, 1935) Joanie Sommers  "a real show stopper...it swings and syncopates...replete with interesting harmonic patterns""
Duprees - All-Time Greatest Hits
Duprees - All-Time Greatest Hits
"Where Are You? (Jimmy McHugh, music; Harold Adamson, lyric - from Top of the Town, film, 1936) The Duprees  "an honest, sentimental ballad which we all remember with affection...simply has no single moment of innovation...a feeling of complacent competence about it""
You're a Sweetheart: The Best of Dolly Dawn
You're a Sweetheart: The Best of Dolly Dawn
"You're a Sweetheart (Jimmy McHugh, music; Harold Adamson, lyric - from You're a Sweetheart, film, 1937) Dolly Dawn  "nothing terribly innovative...but there is a lot of breezy well-being and strength...that never borders on complacency""
Ballads: Remembering John Coltrane
Ballads: Remembering John Coltrane
"Say It (Jimmy McHugh, music; Frank Loesser, lyric - from Buck Benny Rides Again, film, 1940) Karrin Allyson  "not a great song...its sentimental sweetness stems from only a single phrase...that phrase has pursued me down the years""
Jane Froman On Capitol
Jane Froman On Capitol
"Can't Get Out of This Mood (Jimmy McHugh, music; Frank Loesser, lyric - from Seven Days' Leave, film, 1942) Jane Froman  "a three-measure cadence...more relaxed and works better - I wish there had been more of this oddity than there was""
Days of Wine & Roses / In the Arms of Love
Days of Wine & Roses / In the Arms of Love
"It's a Most Unusual Day (Jimmy McHugh, music; Harold Adamson, lyric - from A Date with Judy, film, 1948) Andy Williams  "a waltz in the grand Richard Rodgers manner...romantic, direct, uncluttered, and extended beyond normal length...it sweeps and soars and sings""
Tribute
Tribute
"Sophisticated Lady (Duke Ellington, music; Mitchell Parish and Irving Mills, lyric - 1933) Melissa Manchester  "a unique piece, particularly the release...a piece of linear wizardry...enormously difficult to sing...excruciating line in the release...scarcely lyrical""
The Legacy of
The Legacy of
"In a Sentimental Mood (Duke Ellington, music; Manny Kurtz and Irving Mills, lyric - 1935) Phyllis Hyman  "very lovely...probably originally an instrumental piece, does make a delightful song - much of it is step-wise writing...the words certainly don't fall very fluently""
Sweet & Slow
Sweet & Slow
"Prelude to a Kiss (Duke Ellington, music; Irving Gordon and Irving Mills, lyric - 1938) Maria Muldaur  "another chromatic idea supported by very gratifying, satisfying harmony...except for a totally instrumental release, comes close to being a song - even the lyric...has a few moments""
Mrs. Swing
Mrs. Swing
"I Let a Song Go Out of My Heart (Duke Ellington, music; Henry Nemo, John Redmond and Irving Mills, lyric - 1938) Mildred Bailey  "a swinging piece of music, but for the first half of the release...were the lyric better written, I might be more inclined to think of it as a song""
Sophisticated Lady
Sophisticated Lady
"I Got It Bad (Duke Ellington, music; Paul Francis Webster, lyric - from Jump for Joy, 1941) Ivie Anderson with Duke Ellington and his Famous Orchestra  "IS a song...jump of a ninth in the first measure isn't easy, yet it's the key to the whole song...the release...so pale compared to the A sections"""
This Is Shelby Lynne
This Is Shelby Lynne
"Don't Get Around Much Anymore (Duke Ellington, music; Bob Russell, lyric - 1942) Shelby Lynne  "Bob Russell did a splendid job with the lyric...a daring opening line...very singable...again, the release...simply hasn't the verve of the main strain""
Mose Allison - Greatest Hits
Mose Allison - Greatest Hits
"Do Nothin' Till You Hear from Me (Duke Ellington, music; Bob Russell, lyric - 1943) Mose Allison  "works well as a song, again due in part to Russell's very apt lyric""
You Don't Know Me
You Don't Know Me
"I Didn't Know about You (Duke Ellington, music; Bob Russell, lyric - 1944) Rebecca Parris  "works well as a song...main strain is the most melodic, vocally, of the the three Russell wrote lyrics for...yet it doesn't have quite the flavor of the other two""
American Song
American Song
"Satin Doll (Duke Ellington and Billy Strayhorn, music; Johnny Mercer, lyric - 1958) Andy Bey  "a soft-spoken, underplayed little song with a marvelous, perfect Mercer lyric, and it truly swings""