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Classic American Popular Song: The Sequel - 6

Derek Rivers
The list author says: "CLASSIC AMERICAN POPULAR SONG: THE SECOND HALF-CENTURY, 1950-2000 by David Jenness and Don Velsey

Chapter 4 INDIAN SUMMER OF THE CLASSIC POPULAR SONG

FRANK LOESSER (1910-69)

All music and lyrics by Frank Loesser

SONG UNAVAILABLE In Your Eyes"
Forever Cool
Forever Cool
"Baby, It's Cold Outside (from Neptune's Daughter, film, 1949) Dean Martin and Martina McBride  "shows Loesser's sensibility...the interpretive instruction is Loesserando...funny, slangy, brash, urban-American""
Center Stage: Broadway 1947-58
Center Stage: Broadway 1947-58
"Once in Love with Amy (from Where's Charley?, 1948) Ray Bolger  "one of those easy, dancey tunes in soft-shoe two-to-the bar, drag-and-skip rhythm that lodge in memory...irresistibly jaunty...an unpretentious song that couldn't be nicer""
You Belong to Me
You Belong to Me
"My Darling, My Darling (from Where's Charley?, 1948) Jo Stafford and Gordon MacRae  "with its patter of triplets, is almost as buoyant""
Where's Charley
Where's Charley
"1) Make a Miracle (from Where's Charley?, 1948) Pip Hinton and Norman Wisdom  "charming...an affectionate period piece (set in 1893)...more than a duet: it has two parallel streams" 2) Lovelier Than Ever (from Where's Charley?, 1958) Marion Grimaldi and Jerry Desmonde  "inexplicably neglected...melody and harmonization could easily be Jerome Kern...a built-in lilt""
I've Never Been in Love Before
I've Never Been in Love Before
"I've Never Been in Love Before (from Guys and Dolls, 1950) Maurice Hines  "vocal line has an almost Handelian purity, and the entire song has an uncanny simplicity and poise...in the A-sections, sticks to plain and placid words...but things change...a textbook-perfect 32-bar popular song...songwriting doesn't get better than this""
Guys & Dolls
Guys & Dolls
"I'll Know (from Guys and Dolls, 1940) Jean Simmons and Marlon Brando"
Blame It on My Youth
Blame It on My Youth
"If I Were a Bell (from Guys and Dolls, 1950) Holly Cole"
Guys & Dolls: A Decca Broadway Original Cast Recording (1950 Original Broadway Cast)
Guys & Dolls: A Decca Broadway Original Cast Recording (1950 Original Broadway Cast)
"1) My Time of Day Robert Alda  (from Guys and Dolls, 1950) "a stunning, loose-metered accompanied recitative...changes meter and rhythm constantly, uses extraordinarily expressive intervals" 2) Guys and Dolls (from Guys and Dolls, 1950) Stubby Kaye and Johnny Silver  "well known, but not performed as much as it should be...an utterly delightful tune, with sassy, urbane lyrics""
The Voice That Is!
The Voice That Is!
"Joey, Joey, Joey (from The Most Happy Fella, 1956) Johnny Hartman  "an extraordinary 'big ballad', requiring lots of voice and a commanding style...introduction is musically intense...in effect, the entire 90-bar song is in one simple major key, with an inexorable accumulation of force and intensity...very large in scale and import without being pompous""
The Most Happy Fella (1956 Original Broadway Cast)
The Most Happy Fella (1956 Original Broadway Cast)
"Somebody, Somewhere (from The Most Happy Fella, 1956) Jo Sullivan  "is marked plaintively, but is not morbidly so...wistful quality...builds to a heartfelt climax""
After the Ball
After the Ball
"Warm All Over (from The Most Happy Fella, 1956) Frank D'Rone  "luminous ballad...a hard song to sing, with very dense harmonies that could lead a singer astray...the words are wonderfully well controlled""
Greenwillow (1960 Original Broadway Cast)
Greenwillow (1960 Original Broadway Cast)
"The Music of Home (from Greenwillow, 1959) Anthony Perkins  "nicest song from this show...short (the chorus has 20 measures) but must be performed with the verse, which is twice as long...an Irish ballad in character...the lyric...is the element to admire most...a folkish voice that is older than the classic American popular idiom but not incompatible with it""
Nancy Wilson & Cannonball
Nancy Wilson & Cannonball
"Never Will I Marry (from Greenwillow, 1950) Nancy Wilson with Cannonball Adderley, alto sax  "a big declarative song, dark in tone...dramatic in its shape...phrases are all very short, incisive...like Joey, Joey, Joey, it's an uncompromising song, suitable only for a performer who can sing big but not belt""
How To Succeed In Business Without Really Trying: Original Motion Picture Soundtrack [Enhanced CD]
How To Succeed In Business Without Really Trying: Original Motion Picture Soundtrack [Enhanced CD]
"1)I Believe in You Robert Morse  "a catchy medium-tempo song, with a great beat and neat words...the irony implicit...makes for a brilliant moment in the theater...outside this context, it sounds contrived" 2) The Brotherhood of Man Robert Morse, Rudy Vallee and Ruth Kobart  "a rousing showbiz-gospel creation" (both from How To Succeed in Business Without Really Trying, 1961)"
How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying!
How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying!
"1) The Company Way Matthew Broderick, Gerry Vichi and Jeff Blumenkrantz  "a driving ensemble number, with smarty-pants lyrics" 2) Happy To Keep His Dinner Warm  Megan Mullally  "at one level...delightful...and affectionate in tone...outside the show, it would sound either dumb or convey a rather condescending satirical attitude" (both from How To Succeed in Business Without Really Trying, 1961)"