Customer Review

Reviewed in the United States on December 12, 2019
 This is a well built and functional tester. Not only does it feel rugged, but it is also half of the cost as one from the local hardware store. Looking through the reviews here, I am actually shocked that many reviewers here are complaining about the "ambiguous lights." While it can be better documented, the weak lights themselves convey important information about the outlets you are testing.

In many old houses, the ground connection is either disconnected or connected to a poor ground source, like a screw that may not be truly grounded. These lights allow you to visually see how good the ground connection is when compared to the normal L-N (Line to Neutral) connection, so if the third light is dimmer, then the L-G (Line to Ground) connection is most likely faulty (it probably will not be able to carry the same amount of current that would be required to trip a device or to carry power surges to ground).

In the pictures I have attached, you can see I have two weak ground outlets, each with a different 3rd light intensity. On the first one where the third light is almost extinguished, the AC voltage between L-G is 46.66V AC. The other outlet tested had a more lit third light that is still dim, but you can see that it registered a slightly higher L-G voltage of 97.1V AC. This is still not up to par with the normal L-N voltage, which should come around 120V (standard US AC voltage). As you can see, the lights allow you to quickly visualize any ground faults without busting out a multimeter and sticking multimeter probes into live outlets.

If you are testing outlets often, a non-contact voltage pen tester may also be a worthy investment. Although you are not able to test L-G using this method, it offers a quick and easy way to test which side is live without even plugging anything in. The one I have allows for an intensity reading and reads red on the right side (hot), while the neutral side reads green. This corresponds to the reading of the outlet tester (short side = hot, long side = neutral).

The GFCI test button works well, and you can see that it was able to trip my built-in GFCI just fine. I find that this type of testing to be more practical rather than just relying on the Test button on the GFCI itself. You can also see that that outlet (which is properly wired), has the same light intensity for both the 2nd and 3rd light.

I am very happy with this purchase. No complaints about it so far.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Cheap and functional tester...
By David L on December 12, 2019
This is a well built and functional tester. Not only does it feel rugged, but it is also half of the cost as one from the local hardware store. Looking through the reviews here, I am actually shocked that many reviewers here are complaining about the "ambiguous lights." While it can be better documented, the weak lights themselves convey important information about the outlets you are testing.

In many old houses, the ground connection is either disconnected or connected to a poor ground source, like a screw that may not be truly grounded. These lights allow you to visually see how good the ground connection is when compared to the normal L-N (Line to Neutral) connection, so if the third light is dimmer, then the L-G (Line to Ground) connection is most likely faulty (it probably will not be able to carry the same amount of current that would be required to trip a device or to carry power surges to ground).

In the pictures I have attached, you can see I have two weak ground outlets, each with a different 3rd light intensity. On the first one where the third light is almost extinguished, the AC voltage between L-G is 46.66V AC. The other outlet tested had a more lit third light that is still dim, but you can see that it registered a slightly higher L-G voltage of 97.1V AC. This is still not up to par with the normal L-N voltage, which should come around 120V (standard US AC voltage). As you can see, the lights allow you to quickly visualize any ground faults without busting out a multimeter and sticking multimeter probes into live outlets.

If you are testing outlets often, a non-contact voltage pen tester may also be a worthy investment. Although you are not able to test L-G using this method, it offers a quick and easy way to test which side is live without even plugging anything in. The one I have allows for an intensity reading and reads red on the right side (hot), while the neutral side reads green. This corresponds to the reading of the outlet tester (short side = hot, long side = neutral).

The GFCI test button works well, and you can see that it was able to trip my built-in GFCI just fine. I find that this type of testing to be more practical rather than just relying on the Test button on the GFCI itself. You can also see that that outlet (which is properly wired), has the same light intensity for both the 2nd and 3rd light.

I am very happy with this purchase. No complaints about it so far.
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4.7 out of 5 stars
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