Customer Review

Reviewed in the United States on January 22, 2020
The short story is: this drive is impossible to shuck because it doesn't have a SATA interface and the USB control board is soldered on.

Follow the pictures attached for details. Opening the drive is very easy. Use a 2mm hex screwdriver on each of the four corners of the aluminum plate. Gently pry the plate up and off, there will be some resistance because it's held in place by four gentle adhesive strips. From there, pop out the four plastic tabs which are holding the drive in the enclosure. At this point, you can effortlessly lift the drive up and out of the enclosure.

Upon inspection, I found a Western Digital drive with a model number of "WD50NMZW". The interface is USB and the control board soldered on. It's possible the developer re-used old controller board design, because as you look to the left of the USB port, you see solder points that match a SATA port, in the location where you'd expect to find a port.

In any case, I learned what I needed, put the drive back together and now it serves me as an external USB drive.

update, 25 October 2020: Still using it, still works great.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Impossible to Shuck
By Adrian Van Buren on January 22, 2020
The short story is: this drive is impossible to shuck because it doesn't have a SATA interface and the USB control board is soldered on.

Follow the pictures attached for details. Opening the drive is very easy. Use a 2mm hex screwdriver on each of the four corners of the aluminum plate. Gently pry the plate up and off, there will be some resistance because it's held in place by four gentle adhesive strips. From there, pop out the four plastic tabs which are holding the drive in the enclosure. At this point, you can effortlessly lift the drive up and out of the enclosure.

Upon inspection, I found a Western Digital drive with a model number of "WD50NMZW". The interface is USB and the control board soldered on. It's possible the developer re-used old controller board design, because as you look to the left of the USB port, you see solder points that match a SATA port, in the location where you'd expect to find a port.

In any case, I learned what I needed, put the drive back together and now it serves me as an external USB drive.

update, 25 October 2020: Still using it, still works great.
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