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Customer Review

57 of 64 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Hubris, August 11, 2010
This review is from: Splice (DVD)
The best horror films don't merely provide lots of gore and bloodletting, but tap into the primal fears of human beings, as well as the darkest parts of human nature. "Splice" does just that.

Audience reactions seem to be mixed to "Splice", and it's easy to see why. "Splice" is really more of an art film that has more in common with David Cronenberg's films than mainstream horror fare like the "Saw" franchise. The film even stars Sarah Polley, an indie film fixture.

Polley plays Elsa, who, along with her husband and fellow geneticist Clive (Adrian Brody), create a human/animal hybrid in secret, who they later name Dren ("nerd" spelled backwards, a cute way of the two embracing their science geek status). As in all horror films, playing with mother nature turns out to have disastrious consequences.

Although films have long been using this basic plot that goes all the way back to "Frankenstein," what elevates "Splice" is its great script and acting. Elsa and Clive's relationship, which is both collaborative and competitive, facilitates the whole nightmare, as well as Elsa's tragic backstory as an abused, rural kid.

What steals the show, however, is Dren. The film manages to make the creature both childlike, animalistic, and freakishly sexual, which is not only disarming for the audience, but leads to the disturbing plot developments in the film's controversial last act.
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Showing 1-6 of 6 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Sep 10, 2010, 8:46:18 AM PDT
Ryan says:
"The best horror films don't merely provide lots of gore and bloodletting, but tap into the primal fears of human beings, as well as the darkest parts of human nature."

True, but ths definately tapped into no primal fears.. Unless you have a primal fear of being raped by your genetically altered daughter-son hybrid..

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 12, 2010, 10:36:21 AM PDT
Douglas King says:
LOL at your last line!

But I disagree ... I thought the film tapped into a lot of primal human fears ... rejection, failure, incest, abuse, having children, etc.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 8, 2010, 11:22:38 AM PDT
Ryan says:
I kinda agree with that. I wouldnt say 'tapped into' but perhaps 'attempted to draw from' these things.. And Im willing to bet MAYBE 2% of the people who watched it realised the 'incest' cue.. perhaps the taboo of on screen rape would be a better description. I enjoyed the first half of the movie, though I thought it was poorly marketed and I had to readjust my perceptions to a much slower movie so that I could enjoy it. But it just lost me when the big climax to the movie was a uh.. "climax". I guess I would say this movie has great "cult movie" potential (hell, i love Brotherhood of the Wolf) but I dont think it should have been advertised as a mainstream scifi/horro movie

Posted on Oct 28, 2010, 12:39:20 PM PDT
Doubleguru says:
your review is very funny

Posted on Dec 20, 2010, 9:17:47 PM PST
The two main characters are not married. They are still in the boyfriend/girlfriend stage of their relationship.

Posted on Apr 1, 2012, 11:22:20 AM PDT
P. Johnston says:
NERD isn't really a comment on their geek status, it is the company they work for. Nucleic Exchange Research and Development= N.E.R.D.
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