Industrial Deals Beauty Best Books of the Month STEM nav_sap_plcc_ascpsc Starting at $39.99 Wickedly Prime Handmade Wedding Rustic Decor Book House Cleaning TheTick TheTick TheTick  Introducing Echo Show All-New Fire 7 Kids Edition, starting at $99.99 Kindle Oasis Trade it in. Fund the next. Water Sports STEMClubToys17_gno
Customer Review

61 of 64 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Catholic Church and Conversion, June 19, 2009
This review is from: The Catholic Church and Conversion (Paperback)
As a child I learned that the Roman Catholic Church was a very evil organization. The reasons for this fact were so many and so obvious that it was never necessary to actually list what those reasons were. The badness of Catholics was known and accepted by all intelligent people, hence why bother explaining the reasons for it? One might as well write books on why the earth is round or why basic arithmetic is true. To this day, I've seen much written against the Catholic Church but very few reasons for being against the Catholic Church. Most of those reasons were written by G. K. Chesterton in "The Catholic Church and Conversion".

That's because Chesterton begins the book in the logical way, by tackling common complaints about the Catholic Church. While this book was written almost a century ago, those complaints haven't changed much. Anti-Catholic bigots are as much behind the times as they often accuse Catholics of being. Hence any apologist today could sort Catholic-bashing into two classes, just as Chesterton did. The first class would contain statements like:

"Catholics believe that the Pope is infallible."

"Catholics worship the Virgin Mary."

"The Church has more money (or more land) than any other organization in the world."

"Catholics believe that all non-Catholics go to Hell."

"Catholics believe that all sex is wrong unless it's intended to conceive a child."

etc...

The problem with these types of arguments, as Chesterton says, is that they're untrue. Anyone who has the slightest desire to know the truth could learn it by asking a Catholic acquaintance or reading a book. The problem is that the enemies of the Church would rather not know the truth.

For those who do get the basic truth about Catholicism by one means or another, there are obstacles that an intelligent person could actually take seriously, and those are Chesterton's main focus in this book. The chief obstacle is that the Catholic Church is simply too large. It's claims to possessing the universal truth about God and Man, sin and salvation, life, death and afterlife, are so all-encompassing that it's frightening. Chesterton says:

"To accept that the Catholic Church is right is one thing. To accept that is always right is another thing."

Any thinking person who who decides to investigate anti-Catholic propaganda will determine that it is false, and probably in the course of doing so will see strong arguments for the Church. Actually accepting the full doctrine of the Church is a different class of decision. I would know, since I'm a Protestant who currently wrestles with my choice of church. But anybody in any Christian denomination or none should take the challenge presented in this book by one of the greatest writers of all times.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No

[Add comment]
Post a comment
To insert a product link use the format: [[ASIN:ASIN product-title]] (What's this?)
Amazon will display this name with all your submissions, including reviews and discussion posts. (Learn more)
Name:
Badge:
This badge will be assigned to you and will appear along with your name.
There was an error. Please try again.
Please see the guidelines and FAQs here.

Official Comment

As a representative of this product you can post one Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.   Learn more
The following name and badge will be shown with this comment:
 (edit name)
After clicking the Post button you will be asked to create your public name, which will be shown with all your contributions.

Is this your product?

If you are the author, artist, manufacturer or an official representative of this product, you can post an Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.  Learn more
Otherwise, you can still post a regular comment on this review.

Is this your product?

If you are the author, artist, manufacturer or an official representative of this product, you can post an Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.   Learn more
 
System timed out

We were unable to verify whether you represent the product. Please try again later, or retry now. Otherwise you can post a regular comment.

Since you previously posted an Official Comment, this comment will appear in the comment section below. You also have the option to edit your Official Comment.   Learn more
The maximum number of Official Comments have been posted. This comment will appear in the comment section below.   Learn more
Prompts for sign-in
  [Cancel]

Comments

Track comments by e-mail
Tracked by 1 customer

Sort: Oldest first | Newest first
Showing 1-2 of 2 posts in this discussion
Initial post: May 17, 2010, 10:47:50 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on May 17, 2010, 10:49:22 AM PDT
duckychavez says:
"Anyone who has the slightest desire to know the truth could learn it by asking a Catholic acquaintance or reading a book."

I am Lutheran as is my mother. My dad and wife are very devout Catholics and intelligent people. If I asked them the questions you posed above they would be able to tell me their individual beliefs on the matter but neither would be able to answer all of those questions with any certainty as to what Catholic doctrine is.

In my opinion, one of the biggest problems with the Catholic church is their education of their members. Lutherans and maybe Protestants in general (I know this is stereotyping but so be it) seem inherently more inquisitive and questioning about their own religions. Probably due in part to the nature of our origins. Catholics largely just seem accepting that things are the way they are and are not open to questioning or asking why things are the way they are. Most Catholics do not realize how their religion has changed throughout the years when it may seem very apparent to Lutherans. One example is that they no longer sell indulgences.

I guess I am just trying to explain why it may not be so easy to find truth by asking a Catholic about their churches doctrine, they often don't know. Another example is purgatory in the Catholic faith. Many don't know if that is part of their doctrine or not.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 24, 2011, 10:25:03 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Apr 24, 2011, 10:26:32 PM PDT
A. Brittain says:
@duckychavez
You make a very valid point because unfortunately many Catholics do not understand their faith. I did a lot historical and theological study before making the choice to leave my Evangelical Protestant tradition so I had a very good idea of what I was getting into when I wanted to become Catholic. And having just gone through the R.C.I.A. (Rite of Christian Initiation for Adults) process and my Confirmation, I can say with confidence that over the last few decades, especially since Pope John Paul II (soon to be Pope Saint John Paul the Great) commissioned the writing and publication of the Catechism of the Catholic Church in the 1980s and 1990s, that the Church is making more and more of an effort to educate the laity about Catholic doctrine, meaning that the Church really wants people to know and understand what they believe. There are some good R.C.I.A. groups in some parishes and there are those that are not so good and thus there are some really well educated Catholics concerning doctrine and there are obviously (unfortunately) many that are not. But thankfully there are more and more Catholics becoming educated in the faith and it is these Catholics in which the saying "Anyone who has the slightest desire to know the truth could learn it by asking a Catholic acquaintance or reading a book" would be true.
‹ Previous 1 Next ›

Review Details