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Customer Review

308 of 315 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Second Best of Both Worlds, November 9, 2007
This review is from: Bargaining for Advantage: Negotiation Strategies for Reasonable People 2nd Edition (Paperback)
There are two basic styles or strategies in negotiation literature: advantage seeking and joint gain finding. The best work on joint gain is the seminal work by Roger Fisher, Getting to Yes. The best work on advantage seeking is the work of Chester Karrass who extols high aspiration and concession management. The great thing about this book is that it is simultaneously the second best book in two very different paradigms. This is the best work on the topic of the information parties exchange as part of the negotiation process. That is why this is such an insightful work and worth every penny spent to buy it and hour it takes to read it Five stars and there are only four books in this entire niche subject that deserve that rating. Since I teach this stuff I read or at least skim scores of negotiation books. Many are thoroughly second rate. Reading a really good book on a subject you care about makes you want to write a review for Amazon. See.
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Showing 1-7 of 7 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Sep 27, 2010 11:31:45 PM PDT
Troy Lynch says:
Thanks for the comment, though it is three years old. I like the way you categorise Fisher as joint gain, because the little that I read of his work is to refute the notion of positioning. (I used this in an interview, when they asked me what salary I wanted: I simply replied from $0 upward; this was met with a smile and acceptable to them and has, to date, kept the relationship open. If you position yourself too soon, then you could rule yourself out.)

I also appreciate the category of advantage seeking for Chester Karrass's book, who discusses the idea of concessions.

And, lastly, I appreciate that, as a teacher of this stuff, you have noted that there are only four titles worth a rating. I guess the two others are Dawson: Secrets of Power Negotiating and Shell: bargaining for Advantage.

Posted on Mar 10, 2011 5:33:39 PM PST
David

Thank you for your comments on this subject. Your review seems very insightful on the subject. Will you share the other books you recommend?

Posted on Nov 29, 2012 11:06:16 AM PST
Read in an hour? That's world record level... Know this isn't insightful but this is a thick book and dense so this is very misleading

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 9, 2013 3:02:57 PM PST
[Deleted by Amazon on Mar 9, 2013 4:13:58 PM PST]

Posted on Apr 18, 2013 7:37:29 AM PDT
Resolute says:
[Customers don't think this post adds to the discussion. Show post anyway. Show all unhelpful posts.]

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 2, 2013 11:19:04 AM PDT
wow...he didn't say it took him an hour to read it. he was saying it's worth every hour that it takes to get through it.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 25, 2015 8:09:37 AM PST
R. Browne says:
His quote is "worth every penny spent to buy it and hour it takes to read"... penny and hour are both singular but don't mean he spent just one of each.
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