Amazon Vehicles Editors' Picks Amazon Fashion Learn more Discover it $5 Albums Fire TV Stick Happy Belly Coffee Totes Summer-Event-Garden Amazon Cash Back Offer TheKicks TheKicks TheKicks  Amazon Echo  Echo Dot  Amazon Tap  Echo Dot  Amazon Tap  Amazon Echo Starting at $49.99 All-New Kindle Oasis Celine Dion Shop Now STEM
Customer Review

4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Skip the US Edition; buy the UK original, June 13, 2012
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Sugar & Spice (US edition) (Kindle Edition)
While this is an interesting and compelling crime novel, the "American edition" of this thriller was so frustrating to read (even at the $0.00 price), I gave up about 20% of the way through and paid for the original UK version. This turned out to be $1.99 well spent in terms of orthodontic savings, as the US edition was causing me to grind my teeth.

Sugar & Spice is a well-plotted and nicely paced thriller in the original UK setting; the geography, crime procedures and lexicon are seamless, organic elements of the book. In the US edition, the same elements are poorly executed and read as artificial, implausible, and jarring in their new versions. While the book has been physically relocated, it hasn't been linguistically relocated, and the result is deeply discordant. Some examples:

When Thomas Bristow is driving to see his sister, he travels "to take lunch" with her, whereas Americans "have lunch." On this journey he notes the "contra flow" of traffic;contraflow is generally restricted to bike lanes in the US and the terms is not in wide US use. Bristow is pulled over by local law enforcement, and the officer asks him "Do you have your documents with you, Mr Bristow?" No US officer would ask for "documents" - the standard is "licence and registration, please" and it's a demand not a request. (In the US you are required to drive with your license on you; in the UK you actually have 7 days to produce it after being pulled over.)

All of the above examples take place within the span of three pages in the book, so you can imagine how dense with issues this version of Sugar & Spice is. As an American ex-pat who lived in London for 10 years before moving to Ireland, I may be more sensitive to these transgressions than the average reader, but I don't think so. They're irritating and distracting, and all the worse because this entire exercise is utterly unnecessary. Buy the UK version if you'd like to read Sugar & Spice.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No

[Add comment]
Post a comment
To insert a product link use the format: [[ASIN:ASIN product-title]] (What's this?)
Amazon will display this name with all your submissions, including reviews and discussion posts. (Learn more)
Name:
Badge:
This badge will be assigned to you and will appear along with your name.
There was an error. Please try again.
Please see the full guidelines here.

Official Comment

As a representative of this product you can post one Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.   Learn more
The following name and badge will be shown with this comment:
 (edit name)
After clicking the Post button you will be asked to create your public name, which will be shown with all your contributions.

Is this your product?

If you are the author, artist, manufacturer or an official representative of this product, you can post an Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.  Learn more
Otherwise, you can still post a regular comment on this review.

Is this your product?

If you are the author, artist, manufacturer or an official representative of this product, you can post an Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.   Learn more
 
System timed out

We were unable to verify whether you represent the product. Please try again later, or retry now. Otherwise you can post a regular comment.

Since you previously posted an Official Comment, this comment will appear in the comment section below. You also have the option to edit your Official Comment.   Learn more
The maximum number of Official Comments have been posted. This comment will appear in the comment section below.   Learn more
Prompts for sign-in
  [Cancel]

Comments

Track comments by e-mail
Tracked by 1 customer

Sort: Oldest first | Newest first
Showing 1-4 of 4 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Jun 13, 2012 10:04:49 AM PDT
Mary says:
Jarring? C'mon now. An intelligent reader should be able to easily read these linguistic aberrations without missing a beat. Your complaints are quite weak.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 13, 2012 6:03:45 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jun 13, 2012 6:04:13 PM PDT
mwah says:
Nope, I agree with the original poster. Those were only a very few examples. Even when the author used American idioms and even some place names, she got it wrong. A lazy effort to cash in on the US market, I think.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 17, 2012 4:42:09 AM PDT
Angie T.D. says:
I agree with Mary, didn't irritate me, or detract from the story, and I loved the book.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 17, 2012 12:29:29 PM PDT
It was very distracting. Having lived in both countries, my mind was constantly having to adjust to where I was supposed to be. Very bad translation.
‹ Previous 1 Next ›