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Customer Review

40 of 48 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Complete Original TV Series, Same Bad Remastering like w/ Transformers, December 15, 2012
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This review is from: G.I. Joe: A Real American Hero - The Complete First Series (DVD)
Both G.I. Joe & Transformers Original TV Series were created by the same studio, SunBow/Marvel and they did a great job. Even if some of it seems a bit corny since you've grown up, the animation, story lines, characters etc. are in my opinion one of the best we have had in TV Animation especially in the 80s.

The bad news is the same studio (whoever they are? Rhino? Shout?) who remastered Transformers, also did this. So it suffers from the same issues.

-Video Remastered from original 35mm film with no proper 3:2 pull down with aliasing (jaggies) appearing.

-Some video (missing from film masters) is replaced with the old analog broadcast masters which appear "out of place" since they lower quality.

-Audio is never consistent on mixing voices and sound effects, varies from episode to episode. Sometimes sound effects are to loud and can't hear the voices, other times voices are to loud and barely hear the sound effects.

-Text on ending credits is new, uses a different and smaller font then the original TV masters did.

Like with Transformers overall this is nice, but I still would have personally preferred either a "professional remaster" OR a remaster of the original analog masters...not this half-ass crap which is inconsistent.
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Showing 1-2 of 2 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Oct 17, 2015, 6:15:14 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Oct 17, 2015, 7:21:25 AM PDT
Samson Wick says:
FWIW, 3:2 pulldown only applies to material shot at 24FPS on film and run through a telecine and interlaced at the rate of 2:3. Because all of the picture data from each frame is predictably split into two fields during the interlacing process, the 3:2 pulldown allows whole frames to be assembled from the interlaced material. I don't know about 35mm masters, but according to the remaster notes the Transformers set (that I *think*) you're referring to was taken from the tv beta cassettes which were interlaced at 30 (well, 29.97) _fields_ per second. Since the source material does not actually contain whole frames which can be reassembled the artifacts you're referring to as aliasing and jaggies are probably just your TV (or DVD player) attempting to force 3:2 pulldown by overlaying A and B fields which don't actually correspond to a single frame. The alternative is to set the de-interlacing feature to "video" or shut off "film" mode. This will usually cause the image processor to interpolate the missing lines by attempting to blend the lines above and below the "blank" lines - it will result in a softer image but should eliminate or greatly diminish the artifacts. If this one was actually taken from 35mm film then the studio did indeed screw up by recording it in 480i@60 instead of 480p@30, but I find it very hard to believe that they would have gone to the trouble to re-telecine it only to make such a ridiculous mistake.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 13, 2017, 7:49:12 AM PDT
I feel like what you're saying is real words and makes sense, but I have no idea what you are saying
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