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Customer Review

37 of 43 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Brilliant Zeppelin Mish-Mash, January 22, 2004
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This review is from: Physical Graffiti (Audio CD)
In 1975, Led Zeppelin released their only double-album, "Physical Graffiti," a brilliant Zeppelin mish-mash that combines eight songs the band recorded specifically for the album, plus seven leftover tracks recorded during the sessions for "Led Zeppelin III," "IV," and "Houses Of The Holy" that the band wanted to give a proper home to. It's quite a balancing act, but it works, as "Physical Grafitti" is yet another Led Zeppelin classic.Of the songs the band specifically laid down for "Physical Grafitti," the most famous one by far is "Kashmir," without a doubt Led Zeppelin's second-most beloved song in their catalog, second only to "Stairway To Heaven." This legendary Zeppelin rocker, with it's Eastern-influenced force & swagger, is simply a monster, and, like "Stairway," it contains all the classic trademarks of this legendary band in a single song: Robert Plant's seductive voice that can just as easily rise into an air-raid siren, Jimmy Page's precise, rock-god command of the guitar strings, John Paul Jones' powerful bass & keyboard work, and, to cap it off, John Bonham's knockout, sledgehammer attack on the drums. It's no wonder this Zeppelin number is so cherished by both the fans and the band themselves. But "Kashmir" is in darn good company with many other classic Zeppelin songs on this album, including the equally-brilliant rockers "In My Time Of Dying," "In The Light," "Ten Years Gone," the album's opening shot "Custard Pie," and the thrilling, head-bobbing, foot-stomper that is "Trampled Underfoot" (which is said to have been inspired by the Stevie Wonder hit, "Superstition").As for the album's outtakes assortment, they're just as excellent. The band brilliantly rock out on "The Rover" and "Night Flight," "Houses Of The Holy" & "Down By The Seaside" are wonderful, melodic songs (and I love that daring shift in tempo and back again during "Seaside"), "Bron-Yr-Aur" is a classy acoustic showcase for Page, and "Boogie With Stu" is just plain fun, with some great ragtime piano from Jones.Admittedly, "Physical Graffiti" would've worked just as well as a single album, as the outtakes would've greatly benefitted the band's sparse release of odds-and-sods, "Coda," but no matter. "Physical Graffiti" is a fantastic Led Zeppelin album, and worth every penny of the double-CD price.
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Showing 1-3 of 3 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Nov 28, 2007 5:13:15 PM PST
Oh fer cryin' out loud, you fancy yourself a Led Zep fan and you write "'Boogie With Stu' is just plain fun, with some great ragtime piano from Jones...." The Stu in the title is Ian Stewart, erstwhile roadie and uncredited keyboard player for the Stones. Check out similarity between his playing here in Boogie With Stu and say the same honky-tonk thing on Miss Amanda Jones on Between the Buttons.

And key-rist if I see another person say Kashmir is a master-piece I think I'll lose my Keebler House cookies. What an over-indulgent piece of marmite that is.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 30, 2007 11:43:44 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Dec 4, 2007 3:53:26 PM PST
Alan Caylow says:
You call *yourself* a Led Zeppelin fan, and yet you don't like "Kashmir"? (*rolls eyes*) Thank you for your kind pearls of wisdom.

Posted on Nov 30, 2010 7:20:55 AM PST
The thing about this review that magnets people to read it was its length and description of this worthy product of Led Zeppelin. Although I think next time you could add something about lyrics, rating the songs was a good idea.
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