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Showing 1-3 of 3 reviews(Verified Purchases). See all 7 reviews
California author B. Roman shares that ‘since childhood, I've been torn between two worlds: writing and singing. Now I do both. (While still working a day job!).’ Roman’s gift for expression of her beliefs she wishes to impart to a young adult audience stem for this combination of music and pen. Her singing is evident in her writing and her philosophy is the bride of both gifts – allowing music to assume flight when words fail. Her popular THE MOON SINGER Trilogy has its roots in musical theories and metaphors, entwined with the magic and mystery of metaphysical concepts and matters of ethics, faith, compassion, love, and heroism.

Now she turns to espionage and political conspiracies and demonstrates that she is just as comfortable here as in her other venues. She opens her Prologue in 2005 in a church where a priest hears a confession of a kidnapping – ‘“They wanted me to kill her… but I wouldn't do it. I couldn't do it…” The priest shifts his position to attention, and his tired voice reflects alertness. “… to kill? Who?” “The baby girl. They wanted me to kill her. I couldn't bear to, so I hid her away, where no one would ever find her, where she would be safe.” “You saved a child's life? What you did was a good thing, not an evil one.” “No, you don't understand,” the man whispers fervently now. “In hiding her away I took an innocent child from her mother and father. I had no choice. I had to do it to save her.” “You kidnapped a child? How could you get away with this? Weren't there people – authorities, the parents - searching for this child?” “No. They never searched for her, Father. You see, they never even knew she was gone. We… I… replaced her at birth with another newborn, and the parents were none the wiser. Then, sadly, this child, the new child they believed was theirs, died tragically, leaving an unfillable void in their lives. I…” “Wait! Wait! Another newborn? You stole a child from its parents and hid that one away, then gave a different child to these same, unsuspecting parents? You stole two babies from their natural parents and switched their identities?” Even the priest who has heard it all expresses revulsion. He makes the sign of the Cross for his unpriestly feelings about this faceless man, wishing somehow he was identifiable through the blasted opaque screen. “Yes. I stole them both, their identities and perhaps their souls as well. I didn't do it alone,” he replies, as though the involvement of others mitigated the crime. The priest sighs deeply and probes deeper, hoping for a clue of some kind, something that would help him solve this mystery that the man clearly does not want solved. “And what did you do with the other child?” “Please don't ask me. I can't tell you, Father. Not just for my sake but for the child's. If the people involved discover she is still alive, they will kill her. I have no doubt about it.”

With that terrifying opening the story unfolds – ‘On a flight to Washington D.C., the past twelve years of Michael Warren’s life begin to unravel. An environmental lobbyist, Michael is on his way to testify before a Senate Committee, and destroy the plans for a housing development built on land tainted with the same toxic waste that killed his six-year-old daughter, Dominique. A cassette handed to Michael by a stranger on the plane changes everything. Michael is sidetracked to New Orleans, where he learns a disturbing truth and faces the most difficult decision of his life: shall he expose those responsible, or compromise to save another child's life?’

With a keen sense of timing and the ability to build tension to levels not often encountered, Roman shows she is a master storyteller. Grady Harp, February 17
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on May 31, 2016
This is a compelling thriller, mixing political intrigue with juicy family drama. I was drawn in immediately and the plot moved along at a good pace to keep me involved and reading past my bedtime. I really enjoyed the author's writing style. While there were clear heroes, victims and villains, the characters were multi-dimensional human beings, making the book more interesting and less predictable. I also found the broader reach of vocabulary refreshing. I'd highly recommend this book to anyone who likes a thriller that doesn't depend on graphic violence and gore to provide the excitement.
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on February 18, 2017
"Whatever Became of Sin" is a thrilling suspense ride full of intrigue, with a deep narrative about politics and ethics running throughout. The author creates realistic and relatable characters that stay with you even after shutting the book. I found the internal conflict the main character, Michael Warren, faced to be only too familiar from what little I know about politics and environmental issues. In Washington D.C. nothing is ever as simple as it may at first seem, and the good guys and the bad guys can sometimes be indistinguishable…or even one and the same! The emotional obstacle of Michael’s grief and anger over the senseless death of his own daughter Dominique definitely adds heart to the story and makes you care more deeply about Michael and what he is confronting.

If you like a good mystery or enjoy unraveling a twisted tale of suspense, this would be a good pick for you. Will have to keep an eye out for other titles from this author!
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