Software Enterprise Development

Top Selected Products and Reviews


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"Required reading for anyone implementing Agile" - by M. Kooiman (Richardson, TX USA)
This is a recommended book for anyone trying to use SAFe 4.0 in their office. It gives the basics of Agile software development. I use it periodically to make a point when someone in the office wants to stray too far from the guiding principals. The author, Dean Leffingwell, is considered the leading expert in Agile processes so you can't go wrong with a book he has authored.

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"Very easy read, great content to pull from and apply ..." - by Jeremy P.
Clear, concise, and to the point. Very easy read, great content to pull from and apply in the workplace.

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"Informative and Insightful" - by Jeff Anderson (Toronto, Ontario)
Shalloway's book on lean and agile development is an excellent introduction into a subject that deserves much more attention from the mainstream, namely the introduction of lean principles and techniques into software delivery.

The book covers a wide range of topics, and while I would have liked to see a lot more detailed paid to certain sections (ie portfolio management), I think this book serves it's purpose, to provide readers with ideas on how to supplement and even supersede agile techniques with lean thinking. Alan spends some time discussing the benefits of Agile, but has the courage to criticize some of the limitations of traditional agile concepts. Alan gives good introductions on kanban, value stream mapping, 5 why's, and other techniques.

I was able to use much of the material in this book as a basis to introduce lean to my clients, and found it very useful for doing so. Read this ... full review

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"A Truly Useful Book on Agile Development" - by Lisa Crispin (Denver, CO United States)
I've worked on agile teams since 2000, and have talked to many teams making the transition to agile. I've found that most people learn best through examples and hearing about other peoples' real life experiences. This book of "war stories from the trenches" is exactly what agile newbies need. I've read lots of books on agile development, and this is one of the most useful. It's superbly organized, written and illustrated. The author relates his team's experiences simply and clearly. Larger organizations with multiple teams will find valuable ideas on how to organize.

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"Well Written and Informative" - by Son Nguyen (La Puente, CA USA)
The book was a very interesting read and give guidance into what an architecture mindset should be. The emphasis on domain driven design/development is spot on as I found over the over the years that domain driven design/development is just a natural evolution of the recent agile trend. It just adds another component to any development methodology and the technique and concept explain is really sound advice. The domain driven patterns described is quite relevant and is a good read. I personally evolved my development techniques towards a domain model for application development, but it was good to discover the other 2 patterns discussed in the book (Command/Query Responsibility Segregation and Event Sourcing). Recommended reading for veteran developers who are looking to broaden their development perspective.

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"Great for learning how to complete projects faster/better" - by Michael Cohn (Lafayette, CO USA)
This is the book I've been wanted for years. Until this book, the Scrum development process was not very well known and was documented only piecemeal in a couple of papers and websites. Finally, there's a book a that covers everything you need to know to run your software project using Scrum.
Schwaber is the "Godfather of Scrum" and essentially invented the techniques; Beedle was one of the first converts to Scrum and together they definitely know their stuff.
The book covers everything from the theoretical basis for Scrum to how to organize your teams, conduct daily Scrum meetings to keep things moving along, to planning your Scrum project, to tracking the "backlog" of items that need to be completed to finish a project.
Scrum is not a rehash of another methodology. As the authors say, "Scrum is different." Some of the things you'll learn in this book will seem counterintuitive but they ... full review

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"Enterprise developer must read this book" - by slbrook (Austin, TX USA)
As a software developer, the problem space for an application is quite different in the Enterprise than it is for a small domain. This being stated (and is in the book), Mr. Fowler quickly points us to effective patterns to be used for developing enterprise applications. Like the Gang of Four book, this book is a catalog and a good description of the patterns to be used in this space. Mr. Fowler has long been a guru in software engineering and this book clearly shows why. The text is very well written, easy to follow, and indicative of someone who knows what they are talking about, not only from a clear thought process, but from experience as well. This should clearly be a book that sits along with the Gang of Four book on your shelf (Design Patterns) for the Enterprise developer or someone interested in enterprise development.

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"A good step by step guide" - by abigail
I like the book because it's not tecchnical reference. Include a real example for develop a real project. A lot of books are more technical, include examples but only technical. This is more a step step guide with a lot of suggestions for help in development life cycle.

The book begins with a simple proof of concept and follows a cycle of development. After the proof of concept, the book guides you to set up all you need for work, he suggests a lot of tools that can help you to develop real applications. I think that it includes all topics for developing a real software, from analysis and estimating the effort, how to improve the appearance using skin, templates or how to customize the same project for different companies or users without changing your principal development. The book includes a chapter about implementing security by users and roles. Finally, it ... full review

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"A remarkable assessment of the software world: where we are and how we should move forward" - by MPJ (Renton, WA, USA)
What is Value Stream about? Simply put, it's a call to all of us to address deep endemic problems in our software industry, such as this one:
Although we call ourselves "engineers", we have not created a true engineering or scientific discipline. Indeed, we're hardly even an art or a craft. If you've been around for more than a decade, you'll already know that the software business is more like the fashion industry.

Every 5 to 10 years, a brave new Approach comes along, with new terminology and contempt for everything that went before it. This "radically new" Approach is "guaranteed" to solve all your problems, if only you'd adopt it. Indeed, only idiots fail to immediately see its all-conquering merit. (Hans Christian Andersen would have had fun with this.)

If the fashion metaphor doesn't grab you, then how about religion? Many of the gratuitous debates ... full review

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"A Wonderful Guide into the World of UX in Agile Development" - by JARED G.
This quick and easy to understand read gets right down to what you need to know about how User Experience fits into the agile development methodology. Though small, this book is more like pocketbook guide, packed full of useful knowledge from within the people that have actually been in the industry. Well met!

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"Well written and useful description of Agile principles." - by Sonya N (Dallas, TX)
This is a well done text and proved very useful for preparation to take the Project Management Institute (PMI) Agile Certified Practitioner (ACP) exam, which I passed.

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"Great for Newbies in App Development" - by Marie
If you have a cool idea for an app or are curious about how to build an app, then this book is for you. I recently started in a non-technical role with a tech company and I bought his book to help me get up to speed on app development. It’s a great resource and I will definitely keep referring back to it.

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"Finally a book about Enterprise Product Management" - by Ketil Moland Olsen (Bergen, Norway)
There are a bunch of Product Management books available, and I have read quite a few of them. The problem, however, is that most of these books are geared towards consumer products, which differ quite a bit from enterprise products in their very nature. This book sets out to bridge the gap, and succeeds in its mission. The authors do a good job at identifying specific Enterprise Product challenges, such as the difference between customers and users, and suggest how to tackle them. If you enjoyed Marty Cagan’s “Inspired” (2nd Edition), this book is an excellent companion that will help you utilize some of Cagan’s key principles in an Enterprise-context.

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"Colorful stories and numbers to back them up!" - by Dennis E. Wisnosky
In Software Wasteland, David McComb lays out the history of the software mess, that is the industry, as only a person with his experience and gift with words could accomplish. With numbers and colorful stories, based on his own experience and that of others, Dave shows how each generation of software tooling implemented by the usual suspects, has only piled on to more deadlines that are never met, and costs that can be an order of magnitude more than estimated. Yet, somehow the beat goes on. If anything, based on my own knowledge of some of his examples such as DIHMRS, Dave has underestimated the consequences of maintaining the status quo of building on legacy, and what he calls "neo legacy" systems. Fortunately, he does offer hope in the last chapter of this book, and with a teaser into the contents of its companion book, The Data Centric Revolution, which ... full review

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"Perfect for first time software managers" - by Maged Koshty (maged@ottawa.com) (Ottawa, Canada)
It's simply a very easy to use book, it's structure is unique where it gives you what you need to know either by browsing the most common mistakes in software development process in every phase of the development cycle, or by reading the to-the-point lessons you should follow in each phase..I recommend it to new managers who need to be on the right track in a short time and also as a quick reference for every manager.