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I've been told by my son-in-law not to waste money on one of these devices because I can just use my computer as a video streamer. What's the diff?
asked by kellyjp on October 29, 2012
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Showing 1-10 of 18 answers
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annieo answered on October 31, 2012
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The difference is this small box connects to your TV. To use it you just change your input and you are ready to go, just scroll thru the channels. With a computer you either watch on your computer monitor or connect your computer to your TV. I've done both, the Roku is much easier to use. The computer you have to boot up, open the application, maybe browse to an Internet site, etc.
tx281 answered on November 18, 2012
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Don't take his advice. I'm a very techie person and would NOT tell you to use your computer over one of these. This is simple plug & play. Why mess with having to hook up your computer to your TV every time you want to watch something? Bad advice on his part IMHO.
J. Nichols answered on December 17, 2012
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Teresa answered on December 17, 2012
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I would not wear out a $500 lap top when I can wear out a $ 50 device that I can return if it does not work out.
robert nixon answered on January 2, 2013
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I wondered the same thing. It took me a month to figure out- and then believe it's really that simple- that YES, I can simply connect my high-end laptop to my mid-range flat screen TV, by HDMI to HDMI ports on each device, and stream anything I could get on my laptop, directly onto my flatscreen TV... But, why on earth WOULD I WANT TO? YES- You CAN do it, but why bother? If you do use your PC as a live stream (to TV) device, then every time you want to watch live-stream TV (vs. cable TV), you have to remove your laptop from it's current location (ie, maybe you were using it earlier,
Anonomous answered on December 17, 2012
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You can use your computer as a video streamer, connected either through an HDMI or VGA port on the TV. My MacBook works much better than my old PC for streaming. We added the Roku just to make it easier. However, it may not provide as much access to streaming as the computer does.
rayp answered on December 11, 2012
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Your son is wrong. I stream programs through my computer that are not available through devices such as ROKU. Example, HGTV, ABC family channel, many others. It's more cumbersome, and you can not use your computer for anything else while streaming through the computer. These devices =such as Roku, do not tie up your computer. My wife can use the computer while I stream movies through ROKU. Since Roku is both wired/wireless, you can watch it from any room. for $ 49, it's a no brainer.
P. Stein answered on December 17, 2012
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The Roku is so much easier to use than a computer, unless you can spare a computer to put next to your TV and the computer has a remote control. You really don't want to run a wire across the room from your computer to your TV. I tried it. It's a pain, and can be techically compicated. Plus, the video quality wasn't so good over the composite video connection I set up. There are units that will wirelessly send HD content from your computer to your TV, but the cost likely will be 5-10 times the cost of a Roku.
Jeff B. answered on February 12, 2013
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P. Killion answered on December 17, 2012
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